TFB Review: Telor Tactical Comfort-Air Line of Holsters

Category: Firearms | Reviews

Telor Tactical is a Georgia-based holster company. They make holsters for all manners of concealment, as well as 40mm round carriers, masks, and even seat cushions. I was recently tasked with reviewing three of their holsters: the Comfort-Air ITW Holster, the Comfort-Air Bodyband Holster, and the Comfort-Air LE Ankle Holster. I carried each of these in rotation over the three months, and have some thoughts. Let’s get into it. 

Holster News @ TFB:

Comfort-Air

Comfort-Air

The backing of the Comfort-Air ITW holster is made of a medical-grade cooling material. The form follows that of a leather/Kydex hybrid, but replaces those rigid materials with more flexible ones. At $57.99, the holster is relatively inexpensive compared to other hybrids. The part that goes against the body uses a mesh pattern and padding to form what is hands-down the most comfortable holster I’ve ever worn. The part that holds the gun is made of an elastic material, similar to those used in elbow or wrist braces. The holster attaches to your pants or belt via two spring-steel clips and uses the elastic material to stretch around the gun to cover the trigger guard and retain the pistol. 

Comfort-Air

The Pros

As I mentioned earlier, this thing is comfortable. It feels like putting the cool side of the pillow in your pants. The elastic material holds the pistol in place very well and keeps it flat against your body. While the images on the site show it as an appendix (AIWB) rig, I found that it excelled for me as a strongside holster. I’m a fairly thin guy, and a lot of strongside setups rub against and bruise my hip bones. With the soft materials used, this one didn’t. On top of that, the built-in cant lends itself well to drawing from the strongside. As the name suggests, the mesh material also kept me from sweating too much. Even if it had made me sweat, these holsters are machine-washable! 

Comfort-Air

The Cons

I’m just going to start with the big one. After seeing the images on the website of this being used as an appendix rig, that’s where I started. Carrying my Smith & Wesson M&P Shield, I noticed that when I sat, my legs pushed the gun up and out of the elastic pocket, exposing the trigger. For this reason, I can’t recommend this holster as an appendix option. However, the company does offer an optional thumb-break retention strap for the holster that will prevent this. Reholstering with one hand is basically impossible. Drawing the gun pulls on the cloth holster and causes it to bunch up. After each draw, I had to stretch the clips back out to their furthest point. Again, depending on your use, this could be a non-issue. I, however, prefer the option of being able to reholster quickly, should I need my hands to recover my small child after an encounter that would frighten him. 

Comfort-Air

These are problems for me specifically, but I think that they could just as easily not be a problem for someone with different needs. If you carry strong side and aren’t concerned with quickly reholstering, then there’s really no issue with the holster. Different strokes. 

MSRP: $57.99 


Comfort-Air

Belly bands are popular. I know several women who use them because they open up the ability to wear skirts and dresses. I also know men who use them, primarily when wearing less structured clothing, like basketball shorts. While I think the real problem is men who are willing to wear basketball shorts as everyday attire, I see the appeal of a holster that works independently of your clothing. The Comfort-Air Bodyband uses an elastic waistband with hook and loop closures, and features the same style of elastic holster as the Comfort-Air ITW. Sizes can range from 24” to 58”. 

Comfort-Air

The Pros

You’ll notice the common theme here will be comfort. This thing is comfortable and stays put. I wore it mostly while running, which is where I think belly bands really shine. The mesh is breathable. It never got sweaty, and more importantly, never got itchy. It features a spare magazine carrier, and the placement feels right. The width adjustment for the belt itself leaves plenty of room for post-holiday season runs, additional gut, and all. 

Comfort-Air

The Cons

If you’re using a belly band for your runs like I was, I honestly can’t think of any cons. If you use one as your primary carry option, then some of the same cons from the ITW apply. Sitting and bending over managed to work my gun up and almost out of the elastic pocket. However, the same thumb-break retention strap offered for the ITW holster can be had for the Bodyband. Just like the ITW holster, the Bodyband can be used as a strongside holster

Comfort-Air

MSRP: $52.99


Comfort-Air

Carrying on your ankle has some significant drawbacks, but this position is still used by some law enforcement officers for their backup guns. I sometimes carry on my ankle when I know I’ll be carrying my son, as picking him up will often lift my shirt. With all carry methods, it’s a balancing act between speed, concealment, and accessibility. While slow and not easily accessible, ankle carry excels in concealability. 

Comfort-Air

The Pros

With all of the ankle carry hate online, I was surprised to find that this was my favorite of the three. Having fairly thin ankles, I thought this would make carrying a chunk of steel around a bony part of my body incredibly uncomfortable. Thanks to the Sil-Air Silicone foam padding being placed between the gun and my ankle, this was not the case. I used the Comfort-Air LE Ankle Holster with my wife’s SIG P238 HD. With the right cut of your jeans, a gun this size completely disappears. The adjustment level of this holster also makes it usable for people of all sizes.

Comfort-Air

Comfort-Air

The Cons

The only cons with this holster are directly related to the cons of ankle carry, not the holster itself. It shares the same difficulty of reholstering with the two previous holsters, which isn’t ideal. However, if you already have the time to bend over, lift your pant leg, and reholster, I don’t think the holster will add all that much time. I was aware of the weight on my ankle and walked kind of funny the first few times I used it, but that went away quickly.

Comfort-Air

MSRP: $62.99


The Exciting Conclusion

Comfort-Air

All three of these holsters excel at their main goal; comfort. I honestly forgot to pay attention for this review, because they so easily blended into my daily life. These are also expertly crafted. The stitching is top-notch and all of these holsters are made in the U.S.A. If you find yourself writing these off because they’re not high-speed, low-drag enough, then these holsters aren’t for you. I think all three of these would serve well as a comfortable way to carry an additional gun. Also, if you find that Kydex is simply too rigid for you, and it digs into your body, these solve that problem. Everyone’s reason for carrying and priorities vary. If your number one priority is being comfortable, these are definitely worth a try.

If you’re interested in these or other products from Telor Tactical, check out their website. They’re also on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, so make sure you follow along. Stay safe out there!

Source: https://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2021/05/27/tfb-review-telor-tactical-comfort-air-holsters/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=rss

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